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That's why I always prefer to buy cars with manual transmissions. Yeah its boring to switch from 1st to neutral with the clutch in high traffic, but man they do last more than automatic transmission, are way cheaper to fix since they have multiple separate components and the best of all is you can switch to gears whenever you like at higher or lower rpms
 

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2021 Hyundai Venue Preferred
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546 Posts
Kia Soul's with IVT built before June 2020 had reliability issues and had a software update which reportedly improved reliability. Given the Soul and the Venue use the same transmission, I wonder if there was an update that should have been applied to your car. Yours is the first complete IVT failure I've read about on the forum so it doesn't appear to be a common issue, at least among our group of Venue owners. You've got a good warranty and any design improvements should have been built into your new transmission so drive it like you stole it...lol.
 

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Kia Soul's with IVT built before June 2020 had reliability issues and had a software update which reportedly improved reliability. Given the Soul and the Venue use the same transmission, I wonder if there was an update that should have been applied to your car. Yours is the first complete IVT failure I've read about on the forum so it doesn't appear to be a common issue, at least among our group of Venue owners. You've got a good warranty and any design improvements should have been built into your new transmission so drive it like you stole it...lol.
Yeah, it sounds like his may have had a defective part that suffered metal fatigue and just failed. It happens.

Important thing is that it was covered under warranty and replaced for free. I only buy new (or Certified Used) under a factory warranty. I've known way too many people who scoff at a car payment so they buy a $10k used car then the tranny explodes and it's $3,500 for a rebuild, then something else happens and it's $1,500. Not to mention the downtime while the car's in the shop. Suddenly they're out more than the car payment would've been if they kept all that money.

No thanks. I will just buy new. When you buy a used car, you're buying other people's problems my stepdad always said.

In 2014, my mom wanted a Jeep Patriot. They had a 2,0-liter version with a CVT (the same that Kia/Hyundai/Nissan uses), but for the same price, they had the 2.4 with the regular 6-speed AT. I told her to get the 2.4/regular tranny. It's still going strong 8 years later -- no problems. Her sister bought the 2014 Kia Sportage with the 2.4 and the CVT -- same basic world platform as the Patriot -- same basic engine block design and unibody. They are both still going strong. Mom's Jeep looks better and was $3k cheaper. :)
 

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My 2020 Venue SE with 6-speed MT is still going strong after 2.75 years with no problems. Of course that isn't a very high bar; even a Chrysler product will usually last that long with out a breakdown! But I just don't trust those CVTs yet. Even if I liked how they performed (which I don't), I just don't think they have worked all the bugs out yet.
 

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2022 Venue Essential - 6 Speed Manual - Polar white
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Another reason (like others have mentioned), why I insist in having a Manual Transmission car; so glad I found my Venue with the 6MT.
If you think about it a CVT has a steel belt between 2 pulleys, that single part has to work as hard as 6 different gears in a MT; no wonder they are having trouble with those.
Good thing for Hyundai Warranty though.
 

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Another reason (like others have mentioned), why I insist in having a Manual Transmission car; so glad I found my Venue with the 6MT.
If you think about it a CVT has a steel belt between 2 pulleys, that single part has to work as hard as 6 different gears in a MT; no wonder they are having trouble with those.
Good thing for Hyundai Warranty though.
Yep, automatics are crazy complicated. All those hundreds of parts, clutches, etc.. My dad was a mechanic who specialized in trannies. He began to learn the newer trannies, but pretty much stayed busy with the typical Chrysler TorqueFlites, GM 400, Ford C6, etc. type units and their derivatives. He was in his mid-70s and still working PT rebuilding trannies when he passed away suddenly a few years ago.

A manual is just some gears that you engage after disengaging the clutch and letting out again. Way simpler.

Too bad Canadians only get a 5-year/100,000 KM bumper-to-bumper warranty. We get that in the USA too, but also a 10-year/160,000 KM engine/tranny warranty. However, your prices are way lower than ours. In the USA, a base Venue starts at $19,000 USD which is like $25,000 CAD. But in Canada, the base price starts at $20,500 CAD. So with that price savings, you can probably easily add an extended warranty for like $2k CAD.

Though with a simpler MT in your car, the need for an extended warranty declines unless you really want to keep it for a long time.

This guy does a quality job rebuilding trannies. He has to re-do a lot of hack jobs done by inferior builders. It's kinda ASMR to see him tear these apart and explain them.

 

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2021 Hyundai Venue Preferred
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546 Posts
The IVT design transmission is about as simple as it gets. A torque converter replaces the manual clutch and 2 variable width pulleys and a chain belt takes the place of the 6 speeds worth of gears, forks, slides and synchronizers. IVT is far less complex than a conventional automatic's planetary gear sets, clutch packs, bands and complicated hydraulics.
Hyundai replaced the segmented steel belt used in most CVT's with a chain belt.
Automotive wheel system Auto part Technology Font Machine

Wheel Automotive tire Tire Camera accessory Bicycle part


Here is a mechanical tear down video of a Hyundai 5 speed manual transmission.
Here is a mechanical tear down video of an IVT from a Kia Seltos (same transmission as Venue)
 

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2022 Fiery Red Limited (U.S. Model)
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...Important thing is that it was covered under warranty and replaced for free. I only buy new (or Certified Used) under a factory warranty. I've known way too many people who scoff at a car payment so they buy a $10k used car then the tranny explodes and it's $3,500 for a rebuild, then something else happens and it's $1,500...
I agree -- warranty = no worries for a while. Many times buying a used car is like marrying a prostitute -- it looks good, but you really don't know where it's been.

Fearless leader at work bought his daughter a used Hyundai sedan of some sort, bragging about how he got a super deal. A few months later, the transmission died, and he spent several months tracking down / installing a used transmission. Unrelated, she totaled the car out a few months after that.
 

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I agree -- warranty = no worries for a while. Many times buying a used car is like marrying a prostitute -- it looks good, but you really don't know where it's been.

Fearless leader at work bought his daughter a used Hyundai sedan of some sort, bragging about how he got a super deal. A few months later, the transmission died, and he spent several months tracking down / installing a used transmission. Unrelated, she totaled the car out a few months after that.
It's expensive being a cheap SOB. :) We were selling wife's cream puff 2002 Buick LeSabre in 2010. It was bought at the local Buick dealer by us brand new, always serviced there every 3k miles, garaged, and only had 60k miles on the legendary reliable 3800 V6. It ran perfectly and never left us stranded. I looked up values, and in excellent shape with such low miles, it blue booked for $6500 private party value, $9,000 retail at a dealer.

I listed it at $5,000 just to get it sold quickly, as I hate dealing with idiot car buyers. A friend saw it posted on our FB and wanted it for his new driver daughter (16). He wanted a grandma car since it'd be larger and safer. He said "the price though is high. I see those all day long for $3,000 to $3,500." I said but those have like 150k miles and are rusty and junky. I offered him the Buick for $4,500. Nope.

Well, he bought her a '99 Pontiac Bonneville (the same car basically) but this had 175k miles and was rusty. He immediately had to dump about $500 into the brakes and then another $500 for a new radiator, and the shocks were bad, and the battery was weak, needed tires, some sensors went bad. So he had to spend like $2,000 in the first month to make it road worthy and safe on top of its $2,500 purchase price. So at that point, it was the same price as my Buick LeSabre would've been. And she was still in a dangerous rusty high mileage heap with future repairs (there were some) required soon after.

He later told me a few times how much he wished he had bought my Buick. You can't cheap skate or bull shit your way out of physics. Metallic objects wear out the harder and longer they are used especially when they aren't maintained well by the average dips--t humanoid out there.

I still see that Buick on the road. After dealing with like 20 idiots, I finally sold it to a guy for his wife. She didn't want it. She wanted a $3,000 '97 Ford Crown Victoria instead, but her husband said "that has 150k miles and is RWD. This car is better for the snow since it's FWD." A teenager is driving it now. Must've been re-sold at least once.
 
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