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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a set of wheels from a 2017 Santa Fe that I got on eBay for a decent price. I was planning on putting them on the Venue once warm weather rolled around. Yesterday I jacked up the car and put two of the wheels on for a "test fitting" before I bought new tires for them. Surprisingly, the wheels came very close to the brake calipers.

It wasn't enough to cause them to scrape, but I would guess only about 2-3 mm of clearance. Is this too close? And if so, is the fix just a matter of putting a few mm of spacers on?

Automotive tire Hood Automotive design Synthetic rubber Grey
 

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@nicedream This helps visualize clearances. I assumed you have 15s as stock wheels/tires vs 2017 Santa Fe 17s wheels and the stock Venue 17" tire size. Stock Venue 15" wheels are 6.0Jx15, Stock 17" are 6.5Jx17 while stock 17" Santa Fe wheels are 7Jx17
Issue I see is the difference in overall wheel/tire diameter. That would create an error in the speedometer. Upon further investigation it looks like the final gear ratio is different on Venues that come with 15s vs 17s as stock. Again, assuming you started with 15s, you'll want to select a width/aspect ratio combo for the 17s that keeps the overall diameter close to the overall diameter of the stock 15s.
Info came from:
This explains the importance of keeping overall diameter as close to the same as possible. I figure going from stock 15s to 17s you'll need something like 235/40/17

Product Font Line Rectangle Parallel


Stock 15s to 17s with tires to keep OD the same so speedometer remains correct.
Product Font Schematic Parallel Technology


Rectangle Font Parallel Number Pattern


IVT ratios
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@imaddicted2u: Thanks for the detailed reply, and I appreciate you trying to be helpful. But believe me, I have already investigated the different outer diameter of the 15 inch tires vs the 17 inch, as well as how Hyundai adjusts the speedometer ratio.

I first began to look into it starting with this post in a thread about wheels. Summary: There are speed sensors that count pulses on the wheel hub, which are sent to the ABS unit. The ABS unit converts this to the speed, and sends it out over the CAN bus, and eventually it gets to the instrument cluster.

In this thread I explained how I put a CAN bus gateway on the network before the cluster, and programmed it to recalculate the speed based on the wheel size.
 

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@imaddicted2u: Thanks for the detailed reply, and I appreciate you trying to be helpful. But believe me, I have already investigated the different outer diameter of the 15 inch tires vs the 17 inch, as well as how Hyundai adjusts the speedometer ratio.

I first began to look into it starting with this post in a thread about wheels. Summary: There are speed sensors that count pulses on the wheel hub, which are sent to the ABS unit. The ABS unit converts this to the speed, and sends it out over the CAN bus, and eventually it gets to the instrument cluster.

In this thread I explained how I put a CAN bus gateway on the network before the cluster, and programmed it to recalculate the speed based on the wheel size.
I was pointing out, mostly for others, that the 205/55/17 listed in the manual is not a direct option tire size when going from 15s to 17s because of the different final gear ratios. I wouldn't have guessed that to be the case until I look at the transmission specs.
I read the other stuff you did and I'm familiar with how it works with regard to manipulating the counts getting to the cluster. Those 235/40/17s would look pretty slick but would likely destroy the ride.
 
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Something else that crossed my mind. When you put on a larger diameter tire on and correct the speedometer the revs per mile of the new wheel/tire will be lower so RPMs will run lower and that can affect the tuning of the engine. I'm thinking that's why they engineered in a different final drive ratio into the transmission mated to 17" wheels. To keep the RPMs in the same engine power band and it likely keeps the speedometer calibration the same across the model line. Will it be enough of a difference that it matters, I don't know. Just throwing it out there.
 

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Something else that crossed my mind. When you put on a larger diameter tire on and correct the speedometer the revs per mile of the new wheel/tire will be lower so RPMs will run lower and that can affect the tuning of the engine. I'm thinking that's why they engineered in a different final drive ratio into the transmission mated to 17" wheels. To keep the RPMs in the same engine power band and it likely keeps the speedometer calibration the same across the model line. Will it be enough of a difference that it matters, I don't know. Just throwing it out there.
best of luck with getting everything right...I don't have my Venue yet and I have a question, when you jacked up the car did you jack it just at the jack points that Hyundai show for jacking to change a wheel/tire or are there other good safe places to use, I've had many cars over the years and usually use trolley floor jacks and usually jack on good frame positions...thanks.
 

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best of luck with getting everything right...I don't have my Venue yet and I have a question, when you jacked up the car did you jack it just at the jack points that Hyundai show for jacking to change a wheel/tire or are there other good safe places to use, I've had many cars over the years and usually use trolley floor jacks and usually jack on good frame positions...thanks.
I didn't use the lift points. Up front I jacked using a floor jack using the lower control arms. In the back I used the axle close to the wheel hubs. Didn't use jack stands as I wasn't getting under it, it was wheel off, wheel on. Hoping to never have to get under this car.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Something else that crossed my mind. When you put on a larger diameter tire on and correct the speedometer the revs per mile of the new wheel/tire will be lower so RPMs will run lower and that can affect the tuning of the engine. I'm thinking that's why they engineered in a different final drive ratio into the transmission mated to 17" wheels. To keep the RPMs in the same engine power band and it likely keeps the speedometer calibration the same across the model line. Will it be enough of a difference that it matters, I don't know. Just throwing it out there.
I never thought of this, but it makes sense. I have no idea if this will cause a noticeable, seat of the pants difference, or not. My guess is it won't, as I have searched many wheel/tire threads about speedometer calibration but never saw anyone talking about gear ratios. And a quick search now shows the topic being discussed in the context of massive pickup trucks, where they upsize by a lot more than the 1.4 inches difference in the Venue's tire sizes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
best of luck with getting everything right...I don't have my Venue yet and I have a question, when you jacked up the car did you jack it just at the jack points that Hyundai show for jacking to change a wheel/tire or are there other good safe places to use, I've had many cars over the years and usually use trolley floor jacks and usually jack on good frame positions...thanks.
I don't know what the manual says, but I used the cutouts in the plastic body panel for my jack points. You can see them in this photo:

Wheel Tire Automotive tail & brake light Vehicle Hood


I also have some rubber jack stand pads that have a groove for that ridge along the bottom of the car to rest in.
 

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I never thought of this, but it makes sense. I have no idea if this will cause a noticeable, seat of the pants difference, or not. My guess is it won't, as I have searched many wheel/tire threads about speedometer calibration but never saw anyone talking about gear ratios. And a quick search now shows the topic being discussed in the context of massive pickup trucks, where they upsize by a lot more than the 1.4 inches difference in the Venue's tire sizes.
I only mention it because, if it made no difference why would they put out 2 gear ratios for the manual, 4.267 for 185/65/15s and 4.563 for 205/55/17s and 3.706 and 3.957 for the IVT. Rule of thumb is to keep the diameter close to the stock tire size. The gear ratio is a physical thing so it's a given there will be a change in RPM, doesn't matter if it's a car or a truck. Will it hurt power, driveability or fuel economy, I can't say because I've never done it. All you can do is try it, you'll know pretty quick if it hurts you.
I did find this that discusses the potential impacts, especially when it comes to low torque engines.
 

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I don't know what the manual says, but I used the cutouts in the plastic body panel for my jack points. You can see them in this photo:

View attachment 1234

I also have some rubber jack stand pads that have a groove for that ridge along the bottom of the car to rest in.
Those are the jack points the manual says to use when lifting with a hoist and the included jack. I usually put my jack stands there if I was to be getting under it. I try to lift close the the wheels when changing tires because they come off the ground quicker.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I only mention it because, if it made no difference why would they put out 2 gear ratios for the manual, 4.267 for 185/65/15s and 4.563 for 205/55/17s and 3.706 and 3.957 for the IVT. Rule of thumb is to keep the diameter close to the stock tire size. The gear ratio is a physical thing so it's a given there will be a change in RPM, doesn't matter if it's a car or a truck. Will it hurt power, driveability or fuel economy, I can't say because I've never done it. All you can do is try it, you'll know pretty quick if it hurts you.
I did find this that discusses the potential impacts, especially when it comes to low torque engines.
Don't get me wrong, I wasn't saying it wouldn't make any difference at all. I just meant that I don't think it will be a noticeable difference. Maybe it will, but my guess is that it's not significant enough of a difference to really feel it while driving.
 

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Don't get me wrong, I wasn't saying it wouldn't make any difference at all. I just meant that I don't think it will be a noticeable difference. Maybe it will, but my guess is that it's not significant enough of a difference to really feel it while driving.
You are probably right but my guess is, if it didn't matter they'd have one gear ratio and adjust the speedometer in software. As long as you are happy with the end result is all that matters. Let us know how you make out.
 
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